I’m afraid to start thinking about my life assessment because it makes me feel sad and makes me think about the end of life. How do I overcome this?

 

Q: I'm afraid to start thinking about my life assessment because it makes me feel sad and makes me think about the end of life. How do I overcome this?

These feelings are understandable. However, it is important to understand that Level 6, "Life Assessment," is a very positive, affirming, and uplifting process. It is designed to help you connect with what is most important to you in your life, regardless of where you are on your journey.

By clarifying your deepest purpose and defining your most important goals, you can focus your time and energy on what brings you the greatest joy and fulfillment. This can transform every aspect of your experience, and help you live more fully and joyfully in every moment. The Life Assessment process can strengthen your resolve to heal and move forward in your life in a clear and powerful way. It can also help you release sadness and regret, and find gratitude, love, and peace as you move through whatever you are facing.

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This content was last reviewed August 15, 2010 by Dr. Reshma L. Mahtani.
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